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This post originally appeared on the Google Cloud Platform blog 
by Julie Pearl, Director, Developer Relations

Today at the Google for Entrepreneurs Global Partner Summit, Urs Hölzle, Senior Vice President, Technical Infrastructure & Google Fellow announced Google Cloud Platform for Startups. This new program will help eligible early-stage startups take advantage of the cloud and get resources to quickly launch and scale their idea by receiving $100,000 in Cloud Platform credit, 24/7 support, and access to our technical solutions team.

This offer is available to startups around the world through top incubators, accelerators and investors. We are currently working with over 50 global partners to provide this offer to startups who have less than $5 million dollars in funding and have less than $500,000 in annual revenue. In addition, we will continue to add more partners over time.

This offer supports our core Google Cloud Platform philosophy: we want developers to focus on code; not worry about managing infrastructure. Starting today, startups can take advantage of this offer and begin using the same infrastructure platform we use at Google.

Thousands of startups have built successful applications on Google Cloud Platform and those applications have grown to serve tens of millions of users. It has been amazing to watch Snapchat send over 700 million photos and videos a day and Khan Academy teach millions of students. Another example, Headspace, is helping millions of people keep their minds healthier and happier using Cloud Platform for Startups. We look forward to helping the next generation of startups launch great products.

For more information on Google Cloud Platform for Startups, visit http://cloud.google.com/startups.

Posted by Katie Miller, Google Developer Platform Team

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This post originally appeared on Webmaster Central
by Jeff Kaufman, Make the Web Fast


Webmaster level: advanced
Everyone wants to use less bandwidth: hosts want lower bills, mobile users want to stay under their limits, and no one wants to wait for unnecessary bytes. The web is full of opportunities to save bandwidth: pages served without gzip, stylesheets and JavaScript served unminified, and unoptimized images, just to name a few.
So why isn't the web already optimized for bandwidth? If these savings are good for everyone then why haven't they been fixed yet? Mostly it's just been too much hassle. Web designers are encouraged to "save for web" when exporting their artwork, but they don't always remember.  JavaScript programmers don't like working with minified code because it makes debugging harder. You can set up a custom pipeline that makes sure each of these optimizations is applied to your site every time as part of your development or deployment process, but that's a lot of work.

An easy solution for web users is to use an optimizing proxy, like Chrome's. When users opt into this service their HTTP traffic goes via Google's proxy, which optimizes their page loads and cuts bandwidth usage by 50%.  While this is great for these users, it's limited to people using Chrome who turn the feature on and it can't optimize HTTPS traffic.

With Optimize for Bandwidth, the PageSpeed team is bringing this same technology to webmasters so that everyone can benefit: users of other browsers, secure sites, desktop users, and site owners who want to bring down their outbound traffic bills. Just install the PageSpeed module on your Apache or Nginx server [1], turn on Optimize for Bandwidth in your configuration, and PageSpeed will do the rest.

If you later decide you're interested in PageSpeed's more advanced optimizations, from cache extension and inlining to the more aggressive image lazyloading and defer JavaScript, it's just a matter of enabling them in your PageSpeed configuration.


[1] If you're using a different web server, consider running PageSpeed on an Apache or Nginx proxy.  And it's all open source, with porting efforts underway for IIS, ATS, and others.

Posted by Mano Marks, Google Developer Platform Team

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By Austin Robison, Product Manager, Android Wear




Fitness apps make  great additions to Android Wear. Let’s take a look at one of our favorites, Runtastic. Runtastic is a fitness app that lets you track your walks, runs, bike rides and more. With Runtastic on Android Wear, you'll see your time, distance, and calories burned at a glance on your wrist. You can also start, stop and pause your activity by touch. Tuck your phone away in a pocket or backpack and do everything on your watch.


It's challenging to build user experiences that really come alive on Android Wear because it's such a new type of device. Runtastic does a great job of showing the right information and providing just the right controls on the screen on your wrist. Let's dig into some of the Android Wear platform features that Runtastic uses to make such a great user experience.

Voice Actions

Android Wear enables developers to launch their activities with voice. Runtastic responds to “Ok Google, start running” by beginning to track a session and displaying a card with your total time. This means you can start exercising without needing to pull your phone out of a pocket or arm strap. Android Wear is all about bringing you useful information just when you need it and enabling users to quickly and easily take action.


runtastic_01.png


Responding to platform voice intents on Wear is as simple as declaring a standard intent filter to start an activity.  For example, to launch your activity for the “start running” voice action, add the following to your activity’s entry in your AndroidManifest.xml:


<intent-filter>
   <action android:name="vnd.google.fitness.TRACK"/>
   <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT"/>
   <data android:mimeType="vnd.google.fitness.activity/running"/>
</intent-filter>


Custom Cards

Once a user has started a run, Runtastic inserts a card in the stream as an ongoing notification to ensure it is ranked near the top of the stream during the activity. This card uses the setDisplayIntent() function to display custom UI. It provides quick, glanceable information, showing your activity time. Cool!


When the user swipes to the right of the card to expose its actions, we see some quick and easy to understand options; following the Android Wear style guidelines means that Runtastic has a familiar UI and feels like a natural extension of the watch. There are actions for pausing, stopping, and an action to see more details on the run.  This action launches a full screen Activity where Runtastic draws a completely custom layout.




You’ll notice this data updates live; Runtastic makes use of the Wearable Data Layer API in Google Play Services to synchronize data between the phone and the watch. It's an easy to use API for syncing data between your devices.


Background Services

When a user finishes their run, Runtastic presents them with a special summary card that appears only on the watch. In this case, the notification is generated directly on the watch by a Service. This Service uses the Data Layer to receive information about the completed activity from the phone to the watch, including an image of a map of the user’s run generated through the Google Maps API.


To show that information, the app uses Android Wear’s NotificationManager, which functions just like the NotificationManager on a phone or tablet, except that instead of creating notifications in the pull-down shade, they appear in the stream.




Runtastic's implementation on Android Wear is a perfect example of how to take advantage of wearables to make something truly useful for users. For more information on these and other great platform features, please see the developer documentation.


For more inspiring Android Wear user experiences, check out this collection on the Play Store!


Posted by Mano Marks, Google Developer Platform Team

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Posted by Dan Ciruli, Product Manager


On November 1, 2010, we announced the deprecation of the Web Search API. As per our policy at the time, we supported the API for a three year period (and beyond), but as all things come to an end, so has its deprecation window.


We are now announcing the turndown of the Web Search API. You may wish to look at our Custom Search API (note: it has a free quota of 100 queries per day).

The service will cease operations on September 29th, 2014.

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Google Drive for Work is a new premium offering for businesses that includes unlimited storage, advanced audit reporting and new security controls and features, such as encryption at rest.

If you're getting ready to move your company to Drive, one of the first things on your mind is how to migrate all your existing files with as little hassle as possible. It's easy to migrate your files by uploading them directly to Drive or using the Drive Sync client. But, what if you have files stored elsewhere that you want to consolidate? Or what if you want to migrate multiple users at once? Many independent software vendors (ISVs) have built solutions to help organizations migrate their files from different File Sync and Share (FSS) solutions, local hard drives and other data sources. Here are some of the options available for you to use:
  • Cloud Migrator, by Cloud Technology Solutions, migrates user accounts and files to Google Drive and other Google Apps services. (websiteblogpost)
  • Cloudsfer, by Tzunami, transfers files from Box, Dropbox and Microsoft OneDrive to Google Drive. (website)
  • Migrator for Google Apps, by Backupify, migrates and consolidates personal Google Drive or other Google Apps for Business accounts into a single domain. (websiteblogpost)
  • Mover migrates data from 23 cloud services providers, web services, and databases into Google Drive. (websiteblogpost)
  • Nava Certus, by LinkGard, provides a migration and synchronization solution for on-premise and cloud-based storage platforms, including Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, Amazon S3, as well as local file systems. (website,blogpost)
  • SkySync, by Portal Architects, integrates existing on-site storage systems as well as other cloud storage providers to Google Drive. (websiteblogpost)
These are just a few companies that offer migration solutions. Please visit the Google Apps Marketplace for a complete listing of tools and offerings that add value to the Google Apps platform.

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By Peter Lubbers, a Program Manager in charge of Google’s Scalable Developer Programs, which include MOOC developer training. Peter is the author of "Pro HTML5 Programming" (Apress) and, yes, his car's license plate is HTML5!

At Google I/O, we launched four new Udacity MOOCs, helping developers learn how to work with Android, Web, UX Design, and Cloud technology. We’re humbled that almost 100,000 students signed up for these new courses since then. Over the next two weeks, we’ll be hosting on-air office hours to help out students who are working through some of these classes. Ask your questions via the Moderator links below, and the Google Experts will answer them live. Please join us if you are taking the class, or just interested in the answers.
Screen Shot 2014-08-18 at 8.06.30 AM.png

Class: Web Performance Optimization — Critical Rendering Path
Class: Android Fundamentals
Class: Building Scalable Apps with Google App Engine
You can find all of the Google Udacity MOOCs at www.udacity.com/google.


Posted by Mano Marks, Scalable Developer Advocacy Team



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By Angana Ghosh, Product Manager, Google Fit

At Google I/O we announced Google Fit: an open platform for developers to more easily build fitness apps. Today we’re making a preview SDK available to developers so that you can start to build.

Google Fit provides a single set of APIs for apps and device manufacturers to store and access activity data from fitness apps and sensors on Android and other devices (like wearables, heart rate monitors or connected scales). This means that with the user’s permission, you can get access to the user’s fitness history -- enabling you to provide more interesting features in your app like personalized coaching, better insights, fitness recommendations and more.

There are three sets of APIs designed to meet specific developer needs:
  1. Sensors API provides high-level access to sensors from the device and wearables—so with one API your app can talk to sensors, whether on an Android device or a wearable. So if you’re making a running app, you could register it to receive updates from a connected heart rate monitor every 5 seconds during a user’s run and give immediate feedback to the runner on the display.
  2. Recording API allows apps to register for battery-efficient, cloud-synced background collection of fitness data. For example, a running app could ask to store user’s location so it can map the run later. Once it registers for these data types, collection is done by Fit in the background with no further work needed by the app.
  3. History API allows operations on the data like read, insert and delete. When the exerciser finishes her run, the running app can query the History API for all locations during the run and show a map.
To get started, download the updated version of Google Play services containing the Google Fit APIs for Android in the Android L Developer Preview Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 system images. Use the Android SDK Manager to download the Google Play services client labeled "Google Play services for Fit Preview". You can start developing today using local fitness history on the device — the cloud backend will be available soon. Join the Google Fit developer community on Google+ to discuss the Preview and ask questions. For additional resources and more information about Google Fit, check out the Google Fit developers site.

The preview SDK gives you the tools to start building your app. You’ll be able to launch your app later this year when we launch the full Google Fit SDK as part of Google Play services for handsets, Android Wear and also for the web. We’re excited to see what you can come up with to make fitness in a connected world better.

Angana Ghosh is a product manager for the Google Fit team.

Posted by Louis Gray, Googler

Posted:
Cross-posted from the Google Apps Developers Blog

Back in 2011, we launched Calendar APIv3, which offers developers several improvements over older versions of the API, including better support for recurring events and lightweight resource representation in JSON. At that same time, we also announced that the older versions of the API – v1 and v2 – would be entering a three-year deprecation period in order to give developers time to migrate to the new version. Those three years are coming to an end, and on November 17, the v1 and v2 endpoints will be shut down. If you haven’t already done so, you should migrate your application now to APIv3 so that it continues to work after that date (and to start taking advantage of all that the new API offers!).

For additional resources, check out our Migration and Getting started guides. And if you have questions or issues, please reach out to us on StackOverflow.com, using tag #google-calendar.

By Lucia Fedorova, Calendar API Team

Lucia Fedorova is a Tech Lead of the Google Calendar API team. The team focuses on providing a great experience to Google Calendar developers and enabling new and exciting integrations.

Posted by Louis Gray, Googler

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By Christian Robertson, Android Visual Designer

Along with the Material Design guidelines we released a new version of the Roboto type family. A lot of things have changed as we tuned the font to work across more screen sizes and conditions, from watches to desktops, televisions to cars. It still keeps much of its character that made it successful for both phones and tablets, but almost every glyph has been tweaked and updated in some way.

We see Roboto as an evolving type family and plan to continue to change and update it as the system evolves. It used to be that a type family was designed once and then used without change for many years. Sometimes an updated version was released with a new name, sometimes by appending a "Neue" or "New". The old model for releasing metal typefaces doesn't make sense for an operating system that is constantly improving. As the system evolves over time, the type should evolve along with it.

The easiest way to identify the new version is to look for the R and K. They were some of the rowdier glyphs from version one and have been completely redrawn. Also check for the dots on the letter i or in the punctuation. We have rounded them out to make the types a little more friendly when you look at them closely. We also rounded out the sides of the upper case characters like O and C which makes the font feel less condensed even though it still has a high character count per line.

Some of the most significant changes are in the rhythm and spacing, especially for the caps. This isn't apparent as you look at individual glyphs, but makes for a better texture on the screen. Some of the more subtle fixes were to balance the weights between the caps and lowercase characters (the caps are slightly heavier in this version) and better correction for the distortions that occur in the obliqued italic characters.

Ultimately the purpose of a typeface is to serve the content and help people to understand it. We think that the new updates to Roboto along with the new Material Design guidelines will help it do more of just that.

Posted by Louis Gray, Googler

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By Xiangye Xiao, Stuart Gill, and Jungshik Shin,
Google Text and Font Team, Internationalization Engineering


Chinese, Japanese and Korean (CJK) readers represent approximately one quarter of the world’s population. Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible to all users no matter what language they use. To that end, Google, in cooperation with our partner Adobe, has released a free, high-quality Pan-CJK font family: Noto Sans CJK. These fonts are intended to provide a richer and more beautiful reading experience to the East Asian community in many OSes and software applications.


Noto Sans CJK comprehensively covers Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean in a unified font family and yet conveys the expected aesthetic preferences of each language. Noto Sans CJK is a sans serif typeface designed as an intermediate style between the modern and traditional. It is intended to be a multi-purpose digital font for user interface designs, digital content, reading on laptops, mobile devices, and electronic books. Noto Sans CJK is provided in seven weights: Thin, Light, DemiLight, Regular, Medium, Bold, and Black.


Fully supporting CJK requires tens of thousands of characters—these languages share the majority of ideographic characters, but there are also characters that are unique to only one language or to a subset of the languages. One of the primary design goals of Noto Sans CJK is that each script should retain its own distinctive look, which follows regional conventions, while remaining harmonious with the others.

Chinese ideographic characters are not only used by Simplified and Traditional Chinese, where they are called hanzi, but also by Japanese (kanji) and Korean (hanja). Although all originated from ancient Chinese forms, in each region and language they evolved independently. As a result, the same character can vary in shape across the different languages. For example, the image below shows variants of the same character (骨 - bone) designed for Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Look at how the inner top part and inner bottom part are different. Noto Sans CJK is designed to take these variations into account. In addition to ideographic characters, Noto Sans CJK also supports Japanese kana and Korean Hangeul—both contemporary and archaic.


Google and Adobe partnered to develop this free high-quality Pan-CJK typeface. Google will release it as Noto Sans CJK as part of Google's Noto font family. Adobe will release it as Source Han Sans as a part of Adobe's Source family. Adobe holds the copyright to the typeface design, and the fonts are released under the Apache License, version 2.0 which makes them freely available to all without restriction.

About this partnership: Google contributed significant input into project direction, helped to define requirements, provided in-country testing resources and expertise, and provided funding that made this project possible. Adobe brought strong design and technical prowess to the table, along with proven in-country type design experience, massive coordination, and automation. In addition, three leading East Asian type foundries were also brought in to design and draw a bulk of the glyphs—Changzhou SinoType Technology, Iwata Corporation, and Sandoll Communication—due to the sheer size of the project and their local expertise.

Building Noto Sans CJK font is a major step towards our mission to make the reading experience beautiful for all users on all devices. Noto Sans CJK is the newest member of the Noto font family, which aims to support all languages in the world. The entire Noto font family, including Noto Sans CJK, is free and open. Visit the Noto homepage to download Noto Sans CJK and other Noto fonts.

Xiangye Xiao is a Product Manager at Google Inc. where she works on fonts and text input.
Stuart Gill is the Tech Lead and Manager of Google’s Text and Font team.

Jungshik Shin is the Noto visionary and is a Software Engineer in Google’s Internationalization Engineering team working on Text and Fonts as well as on Chrome.


Posted by Louis Gray, Googler